logo


Cropped from a defense department photo of Pre...
President Joseph Estrada. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Joseph Estrada defies age, shares how he did it: Stem cell therapy | Inquirer News.

Former President Joseph “Erap” Estrada had always maintained that giving generously to friends and forgiving opponents are the secrets to staying young. But time has a way of catching up with even the most formidable leading men.

Since he entered national politics 25 years ago, Estrada has struggled with the attributes of old age—weight gain, a painful knee here, a cataract there. He needed some kind of elixir of youth to put to right what nature has put asunder. And to get back on his feet in time “to serve the people,” he said which has “no age limit.”

So he did it, and is very open about it. What is it?

At the prodding of friends, the 75-year-old Estrada flew to Frankfurt, Germany, last month to undergo fresh cell therapy (also known as stem cell treatment), an innovative albeit controversial procedure where fresh cells from donor animals are injected into the human body to treat diseases or reverse the aging process. Read More

Transplanted gene-modified blood stem cells protect brain cancer patients from
HealthCanal.com
SEATTLE – For the first time, scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have transplanted brain cancer patients' own gene-modified blood stem cells in order to protect their bone marrow against the toxic side effects of chemotherapy.
See all stories on this topic »

Celgene announces three phase III Revlimid trials in newly diagnosed MM patients
pharmabiz.com
the results from three phase III studies evaluating the use of continuous Revlimid (lenalidomide) treatment in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients or maintenance treatment with lenalidomide following autologous stem cell transplant.
See all stories on this topic »

Study Evaluates Injectable Treatment for Tendon Injuries
TheHorse.com
Research shows a new treatment modality for tendon injuries could improve healing time in horses and help prevent reinjury. Tom Hedman, PhD, a research associate professor at the University of Kentucky's Center for Biomedical Engineering Coldstream
See all stories on this topic »

Enhanced by Zemanta